2019 Mill Levy Override

Larimer County’s results from the election on Nov. 5, 2019, show that Ballot Issue 4A passed, with about 61% of voters supporting the PSD mill levy override. 

Read PSD's letter about the election results.

The mill levy override will provide $18 million annually and will be used for: Pie chart of how a mill levy override would be used in PSD (salaries, 14.7 million; safety/mental health, 2 million; and charter schools, 1.3 million)

  • Raising first-year teacher salaries to a competitive level, beginning in the 2020-2021 budget year
  • Restructuring the teacher salary schedule to maintain competitive wages and allow PSD to recruit and retain high-quality teachers
  • Maintaining competitive wages for support staff (classified employees such as bus drivers, paraprofessionals, child nutrition staff and custodians)
  • Supporting students’ mental health, hiring mental health professionals such as counselors
  • Enhancing safety and security

PSD-authorized charter schools would receive their pro rata share per state statute. No revenue from this tax will be used for administration salaries or capital improvements. A Mill Levy Override committee monitors expenditures.


What is a mill levy override?

  • A voter-approved mechanism to fund local schools. 
  • It is a property tax increase used for ongoing expenses, such as teacher and staff salaries, technology upgrades and more.
  • Local funds that stay in PSD schools. 


How much does it cost me?

  • For every $100,000 in assessed home value, the cost is less than $3 per month.  
  • $400,000 home = approximately $137 increase/year  
  • Find your home’s assessed value on the Larimer County website here.

 

History of 2019 MLO

Why did PSD ask for a mill levy override?

  • At the time of the November 2019 election, PSD’s starting teacher salaries were less than in neighboring communities, including Loveland and Greeley. 

Starting teachers salaries with a bachelor's degree bar graph of neighboring districts showing PSD starts at $38,731; Windsor at $38,750; Weld County Greeley schools at $39,270; Thompson School District at $40,000; and St. Vrain Valley School District in Longmont at $43,500.

  • Recent state-level school funding fixes have been unsuccessful. In past elections, PSD voters have approved tax increases, providing PSD with additional money on top of state-provided funding.


Board explored ballot measure in July 2019

PSD's Board of Education directors reviewed a presentation about a possible mill levy override and considered draft ballot language for the possible measure during their meeting, Aug. 13, 2019. 

The Board decided to explore having a mill levy override measure on the November 2019 ballot after a community poll in July indicated sufficient initial support for a possible PSD property tax increase measure. Nearly three quarters of the 400 people polled responded positively to a potential $16 million annual mill levy override. Community members indicated they would support a ballot measure if the money was used for increasing teacher salaries and adding mental health personnel.

PSD's Executive Director of Finance Dave Montoya and Executive Director of Human Resources Vicki Thompson presented an overview of the possible mill levy override to the Board. The presentation covered the goals of a possible mill levy override, possible funding amounts and draft ballot language.

 

PSD 2019 facts 

Students

  • 30,000+ students
  • 52 schools, including 5 charter schools 
  • PSD students continue to have high levels of overall academic achievement* and demonstrate measurably higher performance than grade-level academic peers in the state.
*PSD District Ends 1.0 Monitoring Report, approved Feb. 26, 2019 

Staff

  • 3,823 employees 
  • About 40% have a master’s degree (includes licensed, classified, administrative staff)

 


9th
Largest

 school district in Colorado
(in enrollment)

1,856
Square Miles

in Northern Colorado 


8
 Communities 

Fort Collins, LaPorte, Timnath, Wellington, Red Feather, Livermore, Stove Prairie and parts of Windsor

 

     


    PSD is a “floor funded” district in Colorado.
    What does that mean?

    PSD is a floor-funded district, which means it gets the lowest amount of state per-pupil revenue (PPR) allowed by law. Compared to PSD, many other Colorado districts receive more additional state dollars for factors including enrollment, student population, district size and cost-of-living differences. 

    thermometer to show different per pupil funding among districts.

    • Greeley: $8,326 PPR 
    • St. Vrain: $8,273 PPR
    • Weld RE-4 (Windsor): $8,053 PPR
    • Thompson: $8,052 PPR
    • PSD: $8,050 PPR 

    Source: Colorado Department of Education

     

    PSD has history of community support

    Colorado ranks among the lowest in the nation in state K-12 funding. Additionally, PSD receives fewer state dollars than an overwhelming majority of Colorado’s 178 school districts. To make up the difference, PSD has over the decades asked its voters to make up the funding gap. PSD says thank you for those past investments in education. Learn more on the Mill and Bond Initiatives web page >> 
     

    More information:


    Accessibility Statement

    If you have difficulty accessing information from the PSD website or would like information in an alternative format, please contact the Communications Department by emailing info@psdschools.org.

    Contact Information

    Poudre School District | info@psdschools.org

    Board of Education | boe@psdschools.org